DSM-V and the Future

Today the DSM-V was confirmed by the APA’s Board of Trustees. This means that, finally, the new edition of the DSM will be published and used by professionals. Especially exciting is the number of changes made to diagnoses or criteria, that supposedly makes our jobs as therapists easier. For instance, Hoarding is now a DSM diagnosis, no longer listed as an OCD diagnosis. PTSD is now added to Trauma and Stressor-Related disorders, a new chapter added to the DSM-V.

There are bound to be several controversies and wayward feelings toward some of the changes the DSM-V has to offer. The APA has lumped the several autism disorders into one “Autism Spectrum disorder.” Even more interesting is the choice to move away from the multiaxial system we are all used to, which is bound to raise eyebrows. But these changes are long-awaited and, like most things, will force all of us into extensive trainings to re-learn what we were just taught. Imagine the class of 2013’s frustration when we learned what we were reading and memorizing would all change in a few short months. The silver lining is, hopefully, these changes will make our jobs just a little bit easier.

Find an article on the matter here.

Even though lots of people may be griping, I’m pretty excited. There is nothing like graduating into a new manual for your profession. Even though it might take extra work to learn similar information all over again, I think it’s great that I’m at a point in my life when learning something new is the norm. I can’t imagine having used the DSM-IV for it’s entire duration, then having to re-learn everything. Ouch.

That’s the big news in the Psych world, I suppose. In my world, the great news is that tomorrow is my last day of class for this semester. I only have one more assignment due for my blended class, and I’m done until next year. It’s a liberating feeling.

I’m really looking forward to next semester, despite being so excited for the break. Not only is it my last semester as a Grad student, I’m finally taking a class that I’ve been waiting for since I started at MSPP. My goal is to treat clients who have experienced trauma and suffer some form of Trauma-related disorder, and I am taking the school’s Trauma class next semester. Even though it’s blended, which is not the primary way I’d like to experience the class, I’m grateful that I get to take it. Not to mention the class is only seven weeks long, which means that once I’m done with it, I’ll only be taking Capstone and Internship Seminar. It’s a pretty ideal schedule.

Plus, once I graduate, the ball gets rolling. I’ve made a personal decision not to go for my doctorate (yet). I want to work, build my practical skills as a professional, and return to school when I feel ready. There are so many things I want to do, that I can’t while I’m in painstaking debt, or in school for four more years. I want to get licensed, have my own practice, and all that jazz. In a few more months, I’m going to be able to get the ball rolling. It’s almost overwhelming, it’s so close. (Not to mention there will be no more homework!)

I guess I just can’t believe how fast time flies. And on that note, I bid you all goodnight.

About Ashley

I'm a 2nd year Counseling Psychology student, currently on track to graduate in June! My internship site is the F. L. Chamberlain School in Middleboro, MA. Last year I worked at Seven Hills Behavioral Health in New Bedford. I also work in the Arbour Health System at Pembroke Hospital on an acute psych inpatient unit. Got any questions? Let me know!
This entry was posted in Counseling Psychology, Personal Growth. Bookmark the permalink.