“Americans don’t have hairdos” and Other Cultural Insights

My absurd roommates! Melissa #1, a non-profit employee from OH; Guillermo, a photography student from Spain; Melissa #2, an interior-design student from PA; my partner Kishore, a biology post-doc from India; Laura, a biochem grad student from Colombia; and me, a psych grad student from DC!

I asked a friend of mine from Croatia, an Advertising grad student at BU, to share his biggest “criticism” of American culture, and he vehemently responded with, “Americans don’t have hairdos.” While I am very open about critiquing American culture, I was slightly shook up by this “complaint” (probably because I was sitting there with wet hair). But then I smiled and thought to myself, “How did I, a Psychology student from Washington, DC, ever end up in Boston talking with an Advertising student from Croatia about the ‘hairdo status’ of Americans?”

Boston, given its unique “academic” culture, represents a hotbed of robust learning and intellectual activity, thereby attracting a diverse population of students and workers – whether you’re among roommates or at a bar, cafe, library, or school, chances are that you’re surrounded by people representing a variety of professional, academic, ethnic, racial, geographic, and overall cultural backgrounds who foster and nurture a range of interests and insight (for instance, if you’re interested in meeting a Croatian Advertising student who is fond of flamboyantly coifed hair, I know just the person for you).

Therefore, MSPP is a school that exists within the broader “campus” of Boston – this city provides you with, not just an opportunity to learn about your specific field at your specific educational institution, but to learn from the diverse network of people living around you. So if you’re in or just moving to Boston, I recommend putting yourself out there, whether by participating in Boston cultural activities or searching for roommates on Craigslist or going to pubs or cafes or bookstores. By reaching out to and engaging with a variety of people, you can develop a richer understanding of other lenses through which to view and interpret the world around us. Such exposure not only informs my psych work, but also facilitates a more well-rounded, open-minded, creative, and enriched “self”… and maybe a better hairdo?

Kishore, who I met five years ago at a Diwali night at BU, teaching me about zebrafish biology/genetics at his lab. Here he is selecting a zebrafish for mating.

About sdmosaligantimspp

Originally from Washington, DC, I'm a second-year Clinical Psych. doctoral (PsyD) candidate. I earned my BA from Boston College and my MS in Psychology from Boston University, where I served as PI of a study that explored the relationship between social-category language and stereotypes. I work as a Peer Supervisor for Boston Area Rape Crisis Center and at MSPP, I serve as Co-Chair of the Gender Equality Committee. I like comedy, especially The Onion, and animals, and I live in Allston with five absurd roommates.
This entry was posted in Around Boston, Personal Growth, Social Responsibility. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to “Americans don’t have hairdos” and Other Cultural Insights

  1. These are in fact impressive ideas in on the topic of blogging.
    You have touched some pleasant points here. Any way keep up wrinting.

  2. Very quickly this web page will be famous among all blogging and site-building people, due to it’s pleasant articles or reviews

  3. Here says:

    Because the admin of this website is working, no question very quickly it will be renowned, due to its quality contents.

  4. I love your blog.. very nice colors & theme. Did you design this website yourself or did you hire someone to do it for you?
    Plz reply as I’m looking to design my own blog and would like to find out where u got this from. kudos

  5. Darryl says:

    Hello everyone, it’s my first visit at this website, and paragraph is in fact fruitful for me, keep up posting these articles.

Comments are closed.