Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month. The following is an excerpt from a 2009 proclamation from President Obama:

“Domestic violence touches the lives of Americans of all ages, leaving a devastating impact on women, men, and children of every background and circumstance. A family’s home becomes a place of fear, hopelessness, and desperation when a woman is battered by her partner, a child witnesses the abuse of a loved one, or a senior is victimized by family members. Since the 1994 passage of the landmark Violence Against Women Act, our Nation has strengthened its response to this crime and increased services for victims. Still, far too many women and families in this country and around the world are affected by domestic violence. During National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we recommit ourselves to ending violence within our homes, our communities, and our country.

To effectively respond to domestic violence, we must provide assistance and support that meets the immediate needs of victims. Facing social isolation, victims can find it difficult to protect themselves and their children. They require safe shelter and housing, medical care, access to justice, culturally specific services, and economic opportunity. The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act supports emergency shelters, crisis intervention programs, and community education about domestic violence.

Victims of violence often suffer in silence, not knowing where to turn, with little or no guidance and support. Sadly, this tragedy does not just affect adults. Even when children are not directly injured by violence, exposure to violence in the home can contribute to behavioral, social, and emotional problems. High school students who report having experienced physical violence in a dating relationship are more likely to use drugs and alcohol, are at greater risk of suicide, and may carry patterns of abuse into future relationships. Our efforts to address domestic violence must include these young victims.

During this month, we rededicate ourselves to breaking the cycle of violence. By providing young people with education about healthy relationships, and by changing attitudes that support violence, we recognize that domestic violence can be prevented. We must build the capacity of our Nation’s victim service providers to reach and serve those in need. We urge community leaders to raise awareness and bring attention to this quiet crisis. And across America, we encourage victims and their families to call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE. Together, we must ensure that, in America, no victim of domestic violence ever struggles alone.”

~M

About mmosesmspp

I am a third year PsyD student interested in working with children, adolescents, and families, especially those affected by trauma. I'm originally from Colorado. Although I miss the mountains and the activities that go along with them, I fell in love with Boston upon moving here five years ago. I initially came east to study creative writing, completing a memoir about my experience volunteering in the Peace Corps in Lesotho. I am an avid runner, yoga practitioner, and lover of food. I love trying new things and used to be obsessed with finding and attending each and every cool thing that happened in Boston. Now my days and nights are filled with internship responsibilities and coursework - and I couldn't be happier.
This entry was posted in Clinical PsyD, Social Responsibility. Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Domestic Violence Awareness Month

  1. Yes, I really agree that the young people provided with education about healthy relationships, and by changing attitudes that support violence, at least in this simple way of prevention, violence will be minimized.

    Solar Pool Heater

  2. cure-gout says:

    You blog is eye-catching. I get pleasure from it. Thanks for sharing this
    beautiful piece of writing with us.

    check out this review.
    how to cure gout naturally

  3. Hiya, I’m really glad I’ve found this info. Today bloggers publish just about gossip and web stuff and this is actually frustrating. A good blog with exciting content, that is what I need. Thank you for making this web site, and I will be visiting again. Do you do newsletters? I Can not find it.

  4. cure-gout says:

    I enjoy that you place an excellent content that is articulate and well-written.
    I like this web site because there is so much useful stuff in here. Great.

    check out this review.
    how to cure gout naturally

  5. I agree with you to some extent. Good and fantastic blog. I am interested very much in such publications and sure will keep visiting your blog to check your messages and news as well.

    Webmaster of HP Colour LaserJet CP2025DN Printer.

    The road to success is always under construction. — Lily Tomlin

  6. I’m leaving better life. This was the best decision I ever made.

  7. I can’t find a better word to state how rude those abuser’s are. Without women, the world is empty. Empty in the sense that it seems barren with the lack of a woman’s presence; no beauty and most of all, no nurturing happens. Lets help protect the women; they should be treated in a better way.

  8. Not only are people who’ve experienced domestic violence more likely to use drugs, there have also been studies that show people who use drugs and alcohol are more likely to act violently towards their partners. But I think that goes without saying.

  9. Payrolling says:

    To effectively respond to domestic violence, we must provide assistance and support that meets the immediate needs of victims. Facing social isolation, victims can find it difficult to protect themselves and their children. They require safe shelter and housing, medical care, access to justice, culturally specific services, and economic opportunity.

  10. Sadly, a number of victims of domestic violence who had been in same-sex relationships because of their abusers have reported that these were not able to obtain protective orders because of that relationship. Practice differs from jurisdiction to jurisdiction on this issue. However, protective orders are an important tool for your personal safety, so you should still try to obtain one. Virginia law requires that if law enforcement have probable cause to believe that a domestic assault has occurred (this usually means they are able to see scratches, bruises, or other injuries with their own eyes), they need to arrest the “predominant physical aggressor” unless special circumstances exist which would dictate some other course of action.

  11. I find this scenario disturbing and dangerous. Denying a woman’s economic power takes away her ability to make decisions and leaves her dependent on her abuser. Without financial access, she may feel helpless and unable to leave a physically, emotionally or sexually abusive relationship, which is precisely the perpetrator’s goal.

  12. Aloe Vera says:

    I am happy to read this quoted text “We urge community leaders to raise awareness and bring attention to this quiet crisis. And across America, we encourage victims and their families to call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE. Together, we must ensure that, in America, no victim of domestic violence ever struggles alone.”

    There are lots of Domestic Violence victims actually, hope with this program the crisis will be lessen.

  13. Shine says:

    I really feel sorry for the victims of domestic violence. How can people be so cruel? But it’s also nice to hear stories of people that underwent DV but moved on with their lives. Bad things could happen to us, but we will end up winners if we rise above these bad experiences, move on and live our lives for a purpose.

  14. My mother was a victim of DV. Since that point, she raised my brother and I as a single mother years after. Never got remarried, just left and moved forward. She is the strongest person I have ever known in my life. What she has gone through is unbearable, tragic, and horrific to say the least. I am glad she had the ability to leave on her own, and make it as well. My life is for her.

  15. Payroll says:

    I’m sad to read and analyze that even when children are not directly injured by violence, exposure to violence in the home can contribute to behavioral, social, and emotional problems. High school students who report having experienced physical violence in a dating relationship are more likely to use drugs and alcohol, are at greater risk of suicide, and may carry patterns of abuse into future relationships. Our efforts to address domestic violence must include these young victims.

  16. I was a victim myself of domestic violence, I’ve tried to work it out without realizing how my kids were affected on every fights. I left my partner 3 months ago, now I’m leaving better life. This was the best decision I ever made.

Comments are closed.