Andrea Bedoya – Ecuador 2014

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Nuestro ultimo fin de semana en Ecuador lo dedicamos a conocer Cuenca, una ciudad antigua, y a la vez moderna, que enamora a quien la visita. Lo que mas me llamó la atención fueron las “cholas cuencanas,” indígenas de la región que con sus trajes típicos demuestran el orgullo con el que conservan la historia y tradiciones de su lugar de origen. Lamentablemente ha llegado el final de mi visita a Ecuador. Me voy con algo de nostalgia pero a la vez sintiéndome muy afortunada de haber sido testigo de la gran riqueza cultural y natural de este maravilloso país :0)

Ecuador!

Una de las cosas que me parece increíble de Ecuador es como las personas aun mantienen y sobre todo respetan costumbres y tradiciones de sus antepasados. La comida, celebraciones y vestimenta en muchos lugares aún se preserva con orgullo y tener la oportunidad de compartir esto con mi familia en Ecuador me parece realmente maravilloso.

 

Alexandra, Jessica and Elizabeth
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Ecuador 2014

Hola from Ecuador!  My time in Ecuador has been an amazing experience.  The people that I have met while here are so nice and so welcoming it makes it hard to think about leaving them.  While working at Maternidad and Foundation the people are so welcoming and you can see that they want to teach you everything they can but they also want feedback and to learn from you.  Seeing how passionate they are about the work they do here reignited my passion for becoming a therapist.  I think that it is very easy to forget why we chose to do what we are in training to do and I also think it is very easy to burnout so to see these professionals who have worked in these fields for years still so passionate about what they do was great.  Not only have the professionals been amazing but the host families have been as well.  My host family immediately took me in as another daughter and sister.  I have never felt so at home while being so far from home.  It will be very hard to say good-bye to my family at the airport but I know I have made a connection with Ecuador that will never leave me.

~Macrina

Posted in Latino Mental Health

Andrea Bedoya – Ecuador 2014

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Este fin de semana viajé a Quito. Lo que mas disfruté fue la arquitectura colonial que aun conserva esta ciudad. También visité “la mitad del mundo,” en donde pude pisar al mismo tiempo los hemisferios norte y sur del planeta! Al igual que en la costa, la gente de la sierra es amable, cariñosa, y alegre :O)

Posted in Latino Mental Health

Hola from Ecuador

Each time I embark on a new immersion adventure I am always the most nervous about potential language barriers. I obsess about my language capabilities and worry if I will be understood by locals. Fortunately, the language of compassion is something that is easily translated and understood… even in the Amazon!

The Amazonian region in Ecuador is so full of surprises. My favorite was when our group visited Centro de Rescate los Monos. The volunteers at the monkey refugee camp spoke French while the monkeys seemed only to care about eating their piñas. However, I happened upon on particular Mono who looked a little sad. Even though we were not able to speak the same language we were drawn to each other. He wanted to tell his story and I wanted to listen.

The video that follows is a short snippet of the conversation. He was so expressive and I was so willing to understand. Because of that, there was no language barrier. (This realization and experience served me well once we began working with client the following week.)

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/50436460/MOV_3299.mov

–Jess (with Alex and Elizabeth)

Posted in Clinical PsyD, Latino Mental Health, Social Responsibility

Zully Lizarazo, Costa Rica

Un poco de cultura para los amantes de la historia, ayer fue un dia muy emocionante cuando paseabamos por la ciudad capitalina de Costa Rica, San jose. Entre tantas maravillas, visitamos el museo nacional que se encuentra en el downtown de San Jose, un lugar muy agradable y peculiar por su historia. El museo fue fundado en 1887 durante el gobierno del presidente Bernardo Soto con el fin de estudiar productos naturales y artisticos, desde entonces ah sido parte de la herencia cultural costarisence. PURA VIDA.

Museo Nacional

Museo Nacional

Costa Rica and San Jose – Cat

Hello,

It’s Wednesday and we officially only have 10 more days in Costs Rica. The time has flown by. Veronica added a beautiful post about our time in Manuel Antonio, and the beaches and our time spent there. Unfortunately, the majority of our group somehow came in contact with a pretty intense stomach bug and five out of the seven us have fallen ill this week. It took a while, but almost everyone is now on antibiotics and are on the mend. Yesterday UNIBE took us on a tour of San Jose, showing us the Teatro Nacional, the Museo Nacional, and the Mercado de los Artesanos. The Teatro Nacional is a beautiful theatre detailed in gold-leaf and paintings on canvas. The seats reminded me of the seats at Fenway, although more ornate, since they are removable and have metal backs and arms. The Theater is small, containing only 1,400 seats, but holds its own as one of San Jose’s treasures. The Museo Nacional contains much of San Jose’s history archived in photos and within its building structure. The highlight (at least for me) was the Butterfly Garden that begins and ends the tour. At first we had a hard time finding the butterflies (for a minute I wondered if it was just a plan garden), but slowly the butterflies emerged and flew slowly around the garden. The colors of the butterflies alone were worth the trip. The Mercado de los Artesanos is busy, extremely crowded and a little overwhelming, but also a great experience! Vendors greet everyone who walks by and encourages them into their stalls. Bargaining is a must for everyone, but as we discovered the vendors were more open to negotiating with the men of the group. I’m not sure if it was their fluidity in Spanish, gender, or negotiating skills, but they walked away paying far lower prices than most of the ladies in the group! At about 3am this morning we experienced yet another “tremble” in the earth. It lasted less time, but was stronger – people here are saying it was a magnitude 4.8, but lasted only several seconds so there was no damage. Just a little bit of adrenaline in the middle of the night! Tomorrow we look forward to our second hypnosis class, in which our teacher promises to try and bring us back to the moment of our births. Some of us are skeptical, but we are all curious. We are sending healing vibes to our friends who are working on feeling better physically.   More Soon! Cat

Costa Rica and San Jose

Hello,

It’s Wednesday and we officially only have 10 more days in Costs Rica. The time has flown by. Veronica added a beautiful post about our time in Manuel Antonio, and the beaches and our time spent there. Unfortunately, the majority of our group somehow came in contact with a pretty intense stomach bug and five out of the seven us have fallen ill this week. It took a while, but almost everyone is now on antibiotics and are on the mend.

Yesterday UNIBE took us on a tour of San Jose, showing us the Teatro Nacional, the Museo Nacional, and the Mercado de los Artesanos. The Teatro Nacional is a beautiful theatre detailed in gold-leaf and paintings on canvas. The seats reminded me of the seats at Fenway, although more ornate, since they are removable and have metal backs and arms. The Theater is small, containing only 1,400 seats, but holds its own as one of San Jose’s treasures.

The Museo Nacional contains much of San Jose’s history archived in photos and within its building structure. The highlight (at least for me) was the Butterfly Garden that begins and ends the tour. At first we had a hard time finding the butterflies (for a minute I wondered if it was just a plan garden), but slowly the butterflies emerged and flew slowly around the garden. The colors of the butterflies alone were worth the trip.

The Mercado de los Artesanos is busy, extremely crowded and a little overwhelming, but also a great experience! Vendors greet everyone who walks by and encourages them into their stalls. Bargaining is a must for everyone, but as we discovered the vendors were more open to negotiating with the men of the group. I’m not sure if it was their fluidity in Spanish, gender, or negotiating skills, but they walked away paying far lower prices than most of the ladies in the group!

At about 3am this morning we experienced yet another “tremble” in the earth. It lasted less time, but was stronger – people here are saying it was a magnitude 4.8, but lasted only several seconds so there was no damage. Just a little bit of adrenaline in the middle of the night!

Tomorrow we look forward to our second hypnosis class, in which our teacher promises to try and bring us back to the moment of our births. Some of us are skeptical, but we are all curious.

We are sending healing vibes to our friends who are working on feeling better physically.

 

More Soon!

Cat

Graduate Certificate in Executive Coaching helps prepare you for ICF coach certification

The GCEC positions graduates for certification by the International Coach Federation (ICF), checking the boxes on a number of important requirements. For coaches who don’t have a clinical or counseling degree, the ICF certification can assure clients that the coach has been trained in theory, practice, and professional standards.

All of the following requirements for ICF Associate Coach Certification or ACC are met during through the GCEC program.

Mentoring

The ICF requires coaches to receive ten hours of mentor coaching. During the GCEC practicum, supervisor coaches and the professor of the practicum provide more than ten hours of mentoring to students.

This experience is so valuable that some of my colleagues seek out mentor coaches at important points in their career. Mentors or supervisors can help you see you blind spots, give special attention to a competency that needs development, or help you expand your range of coaching approaches.

ICF expects you to deliver a mentor log that captures the coach’s name, ICF c
redential, hours of mentoring, and period during which mentoring took place. You may want to start keep a log during the practicum.

Coach specific trainingCertification matters to some clients

ICF requires coaches to complete 60 hours of coaching training. The GCEC meets this requirement.

MSPP is in regular dialogue with accreditation officials at ICF to ensure that the Executive Coaching certificate teaches theory, practice, and professional hardstand aligned with ICF’s eleven core coaching competencies. Because the ICF certification application is designed for people trained at different institutions, you’ll be asked to attest to having studied each of the competencies. For graduates of the GCEC, check yes for all.

Additional requirements

Client coaching hours

ICF requires 100 coaching hours with at least eight clients. Seventy five of 100 hours must be with paid clients. Though this sounds challenging, you’ll begin to coach clients informally almost from the start of the GCEC. These informal hours may be pro-bono. In some cases, in-kind payment or a nominal fee may allow your coaching hours to qualify as paid hours. The professor of the practicum can offer more advice about this. Start logging coaching hours from the start of the program. It’s a valuable exercise and a foundation for habits of a professional coach.  Find and download a sample client log at ICF.

I was able to deliver the number of coaching hours ICF requires within a few months after graduation. One of my colleagues reached out to business colleagues and offered them a competitively low fee for coaching and an invitation to help her work toward ICF certification. More than enough of them were eager to help as well as to take advantage of her coaching. She also collected the number of needed hours in a short time after graduation.

Coach Knowledge Assessment

This comprehensive assessment was introduced in April 2014. After submitting the certification application, ICF sends an invitation to complete the 155-question test within 60 days.

The assessment is designed to confirm the coach’s knowledge: knowledge of theory and standards, awareness of common issues, ability to apply the ICF competencies. All of the questions are based on its definition of coaching, the core competencies, and the code of ethics. Though all questions are multiple choice, some require you to identify the best response to “a scenario that requires deeper understanding.”

Emily Williams, ICF Senior Credentialing Coordinator, says, “The purpose of the test is to confirm what coaches know, not to test their ability to second-guess tricky questions. The best way to prepare is to review the coaching definition, code of ethics, and core competencies

Resources

In addition to self study, after becoming an ICF member through application for certification, you’ll have access to virtual education calls.  There are many recorded session teleseminars, including a more than one on Code of Ethics and Competencies.

Posted in Executive Coaching

Costa Rica Weekend Report

The second week in Costa Rica has come to an end. This past weekend we went to Manuel Antonio National Park. We spent Saturday laying out at the beach, eating civiche, and relaxing. At one point a bunch of men began running to one side of the beach and were then followed by a truck. Of course we had to get in on the chismes, so we asked nearby onlookers what was happening. One lady told us that a parasailing cord broke and that a couple had flown toward the land before falling. No ne was certain what happened to the parasailors, but it was then that we decided not o do any water sports. It began to pour shortly after the incident, so we went to eat lunch. The rain did not stop until around nine at night. Although it rained, we had a good time shopping around and even squeezing in a small siesta.

 

Manuel Antonio

Manuel Antonio

The next day we got up bright and early and headed to the National Park. Luckily, our hostel was in a great location, so we saved money on cab fare by walking. Once in the park we saw monkeys, sloths, and iguanas. There was a path that led us to a beach that looked like it came from a scene in a movie. After setting our towels down and claiming our spot, we took turns spending time in the water. At one point we had a visit from a raccoon. The raccoon went around the beach in search for food. He looked through a couple of bags before making his way over to our spot. He must have smelled our Doritos because he came over and snatched them. I was surprised how close he got to us, as well as by his entitlement to our snacks. Even though he finished off our snacks, we, and people nearby had the perfect opportunity to take pictures. The majority of us spent all day in the water until we got too hungry to stay at the park.   Linner (lunch/dinner) was next on the agenda before our bus came to take us back to San Jose.

Best, Veronica Rios

Posted in Latino Mental Health